How to Store Desserts and Ices

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Desserts-and-Ices_cNearly all sweet courses, and all ices, can be stored in the freezer. Additionally, such items as pancakes and sponge-cakes, which have been stored, can be quickly transformed with fruit, cream, ice cream or sweet sauces to make a superb finish to a meal. Only milk puddings are not successful in the freezer, becoming mushy or curdled on thawing. Read about such sweets: steamed and baked puddings, steamed fresh fruit puddings, sponge fresh fruit puddings, fruit crumbles, fruit in syrup and wine, jellies, mousses and cold souffles, cheesecake, icebox cakes, ice cream, fresh fruit ices, sorbets, bombes or moulds.


Ice cream preparation

Ices for the freezer are best made with pure cream and gelatine or egg yolks. Evaporated milk can be used if the unopened tin is boiled for ten minutes, cooled and chilled overnight in the refrigerator, but the flavour is not as good.

A crank attachment in the freezer will give very smooth ice cream; but it is expensive, and, instead, ice cream can be well beaten with a mixer or liquidiser during freezing. Egg, gelatine, cream or sugar syrup will stop ice crystals forming, and gelatine gives a particularly smooth ice. Whipped egg whites give lightness. Too much sugar prevents freezing, but freezing diminishes sweetness; a correct proportion is one part sugar to four parts liquid. Flavourings should be strong and pure.

Ice cream ready to be frozen should be packed into trays and chilled until just solid about 1/2 inch from the edge. The mixture should then be beaten and frozen again, and beaten every hour for smoothness until packed for storage. It is often convenient to make ice cream in the ice-making part of the refrigerator where it can be given constant attention, and to pack and transfer it to the freezer for storage after the final beating.

Steamed and baked puddings

Preparation and packing Make standard sponge pudding or cake mixture recipes, and steam or bake in foil containers. Cool and cover with foil or put into polythene bags for storage.

Thawing and serving Thaw at room temperature for 2 hours, then steam for 45 minutes.

Storage time 12 months.

Special notes Dried fruit or nuts can be included in recipes. But jam or syrup at the bottom of dishes may make the pudding soggy. Highly spiced puddings will develop off-flavours.

Steamed fresh fruit puddings

Preparation and packing Make suet pudding with fresh fruit filling, and steam in foil. Cool, cover with foil.

Thawing and serving Thaw at room temperature for 2 hours, then steam for 45 minutes.

Storage time 2 months.

Special notes Plums, gooseberries and rhubarb are good fillings. Apples tend to discolour.

Sponge fresh fruit puddings

Preparation and packing Sweetened fruit such as plums, gooseberries or apricots can be topped with sponge mixture and baked in a foil case before freezing. Since cooking time almost equals thawing and reheating time, it may be more practical to freeze these puddings raw.

Thawing and serving Thaw baked puddings for 2 hours at room temperature, then heat at 375°F (Gas Mark 5) for 30 minutes. Bake raw pudding while still frozen at 400°F (Gas Mark 6) for 30 minutes, then at 375°F (Gas Mark 5) for 30 minutes.

Storage time 2 months.

Fruit crumbles

Preparation and packing Put fresh sugared fruit in a foil basin and cover with crumble topping. Cover with foil lid, or put into polythene bag for storage.

Thawing and serving Put an uncooked frozen pudding into the oven and bake at 400°F (Gas Mark 6) for 30 minutes, then at 375°F (Gas Mark 5) for 30 minutes.

Storage time 2 months.

Fruit in syrup and wine

Preparation and packing Fruit in syrup can be flavoured with liqueurs, or can be cooked in wine and syrup. Fruit should always be packed in leak-proof containers since the syrup may not freeze solid. It is better to package fruits in individual containers as they may lose moisture on thawing and thin the syrup, and the effect will be lessened if only a single fruit is involved.

Thawing and serving Thaw in refrigerator for 8 hours, or heat at 350°F (Gas Mark 4) for 45 minutes to serve hot.

Storage time 2 months.

Special notes This is an excellent way of preserving fruit such as pears and peaches which discolour in the freezer.

Jellies

Preparation and packing Prepare in foil cases or the normal serving dishes.

Thawing and serving Thaw in refrigerator for 8 hours.

Storage time 1 month.

Special notes Jelly does not freeze entirely successfully, as ice crystals form during freezing which break up the structure of the jelly. Although it remains set, the jelly becomes granular, uneven and cloudy.

Mousses and cold souffles

Preparation and packing Mixtures of eggs, cream, and sometimes fruit and egg whites, freeze well, and the granular effect of gelatine does not show in these creamy sweets as it does in plain jelly. They are best prepared in the dishes in which they will be served if these will withstand the low temperature of the freezer.

Thawing and serving Thaw in refrigerator for 8 hours.

Storage time 1 month.

Special notes Chocolate and lemon flavours are particularly good.

Cheesecake

Preparation and packing Both baked and gelatine-set cheescakes freeze well. They are best made in cake tins with removable bases, cooled and frozen unwrapped, then packed in foil and rigid containers to avoid damage.

Thawing and serving Thaw in refrigerator for 8 hours.

Storage time 1 month.

Icebox cakes

Preparation and packing Follow the recipe for Icebox Cake, arranging biscuits and creamed mixture on a piece of cardboard covered with foil. Wrap in foil.

Thawing and serving Remove wrappings and thaw in the refrigerator for 3 hours before covering with whipped cream.

Storage time 1 month.

Ice cream

Preparation and packing Make Cream Ice, Custard Ice or Gelatine Ice, flavouring to taste, and pack in containers of rigid plastic, or in waxed containers.

Thawing and serving Serve straight from freezer.

Storage time 12 months.

Fresh fruit ices

Preparation and packing Ices ade from fresh fruit puree and cream freeze well. Prepare Fresh Fruit Ice and add some pieces of fruit if liked. Pack in waxed or rigid plastic containers.

Thawing and serving Serve traight from freezer.

Storage time 12 months.

Special notes Raspberries, strawberries and apricots are particularly good for this type of ice cream.

Sorbets

Preparation and packing Water ces prepared with fruit juice, sugar syrup and gelatine do not freeze completely hard in storage. They may be packed into waxed or rigid plastic containers. For party presentation, orange or lemon sorbet can be packed into clean fruit skins and wrapped in foil for storage.

Thawing and serving Serve traight from freezer. If the ice has been packed in containers, it may be scooped out into clean fruit skins and returned unwrapped to the freezer for 1 hour before serving, so that the skins are frosted.

Storage time 12 months.

Bombes or moulds

Preparation and packing Double-sided moulds may be bought for making moulds, but any metal mould or bowl may be used such as a jelly mould. Soften ice cream slightly before filling the mould. If packing in layers of different flavours, put in the first layer and freeze for one hour before adding the next layer, to avoid mixing of colours and flavours Fruit or liqueurs may be added to the ice cream, or fruit can be used to fill the centre of a mould. Wrap in foil for storage.

Thawing and serving Unmould on to chilled plate, using cloth wrung out in hot water to release ice cream. Wrap in foil and return to freezer for one hour before serving.

Storage time 12 months.

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